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jq79547

Keeping in view some of the recent cases (Tappin, O'Dwyer) isn't it unfair to extradite those individuals, considering the circumstances of the cases?

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Answered by Kelly Jones
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Reasoning on extradition of offender

In order to protect the rights to due process of individuals facing possible legal proceedings in the
U.S., American officials do not generally comment on individual cases. Therefore, we cannot discuss the
details of these cases, and will only comment on the treaty and U.S. legal procedures in general.
• Every time the U.S. requests an extradition from the UK, we provide significant evidence to
British authorities to back up the request. A suspect must be charged in the U.S. in a charging document
that meets the U.S. probable cause standard before an extradition request is submitted to the UK.
Individuals are only extradited after a UK court has reviewed the case and determined that it meets the
legal requirements for extradition. In the United States, anyone accused of a crime – including someone
extradited from another country — is innocent until proven guilty. The presumption of innocence is the
cornerstone of our legal system. The U.S. also respects all due process rights that a suspect may want to
exercise in the UK or European courts to challenge his extradition to the U.S., and we guarantee the right
to a fair and speedy trial in the U.S. Courts. Extenuating circumstances, such as a serious medical
condition, are taken into consideration in the U.S. judicial system, just as they are in the UK. 
jca68145
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Written 4 years ago
 
 
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