{{statusText}}
{{statusText}}
jq79554

How does the extradition process work?

Note: {{noteText}}
{{noteText}}
 
 
  •  
  •  
  •  
Answered by Kelly Jones
0 Upvotes

Extradition process

 Extradition practice varies greatly, depending on the country involved. Typically, extradition is
comprised of a judicial and an executive phase. After a person has been located and arrested in the
requested country, the case enters the judicial phase. During the judicial phase, a court will determine
whether the extradition request meets the requirements of the applicable extradition treaty and the law of
the requested country. If so, the judicial authority will rule on whether the person may be extradited. If the
judicial authority rules that the person may be extradited, the case enters the executive phase, in which an
executive authority of the government of the requested country, usually a Prime Minister, Minister of
Justice or Minister of Foreign Affairs (for the United States, the appropriate executive authority is the
Secretary of State), will determine whether the requested country will surrender the wanted person in
extradition. If so, the executive authority may issue a surrender order. Depending on the country involved,
both the judicial ruling and the executive decision to surrender the wanted person may be subject to
multiple levels of appeal. Once the requested country is ready to surrender the person, its authorities will
coordinate with authorities in the requesting country to transfer the wanted person in custody.
jca68138
Note: {{noteText}}
{{noteText}}
Written 4 years ago
 
 
  •  
  •  
  •  
Scroll Down